Sunday, February 19, 2006

The Golden Disability Ticket

Holy crap.

Is it any surprise at all that the population of kids considered disabled keeps growing? If you're not disabled, you get the dreaded Standard Education. If you are, you get to go to private prep school in Maine with an artist in residence and beautiful classmates named Hampton. On the public's dime.

What kind of people can live with themselves after saying, I want the public to spend a hundred grand on my kid's education, while finding ways to cut spending for all the other kids in order to pay for it?

2 comments:

Notta Wallflower said...

Let me tell you, plenty of people can live with themselves by denying other children appropriate education so that their child can receive what they deem is "appropriate". The reason why? Entitlement. The scary thing is, all of those cases listed in this article could happen to several of the cases I work with currently. Sadly, in the last case, even though the district "won", it lost almost as much money as just "giving in" to these parents. Any logical person would realize this system is not sustainable. Problem is that, the parents I know who are willing to go this far appear to have little ability to be reasonable. I fully understand why taxpayers don't want to give more funding to schools - because these kinds of cases happen now in almost every district. I know this article had to do with CA schools, but I'd be interested to see data on each state and the number of similar cases they have. It was no different in WA. Now, these kinds of demands are not limited to people with lawyers - they happen even in lower socioeconomic areas. Here in CA, there are websites that "coach" parents on how to write letters and the specific phrasing to use in order to get what they want from school districts - whether or not it's reasonable or "appropriate". Very good article - I've saved it on my desktop to share it with co-workers. Thanks!

tessence said...

Yeah, I knew you would have some interesting insight on this one. I guess those of us not in the education biz are pretty naive about what's going on.